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COVID-19 Life now and beyond


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13 minutes ago, BearSmog said:

I work in supported living supporting vulnerable adults with learning disabilities, no chance of me working from home... 

You're doing the Gods' work, mate, I can't imagine how difficult it must be at the moment.

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I had my test results back and they were positive for Covid-19.. So lucky that I just had the mild symptoms!! 

Hope everyone's doing well and keeping healthy! Haven't posted for a few months due to being busy and the lack of football, but had a gradual read through this thread. Crazy looking back at the f

Branson owns an island and a spaceship, but he wants aid from the government and he’s happy to hang his employees out to dry the man is callous. 

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2 hours ago, trekkers said:

Got a call from my Ops Director today saying that the client at the offices where we work have advised the workforce to work from home. Not sure where that leaves me and my catering team tomorrow!!!!

You could send them cookies 😉

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9 hours ago, wilsoncgp said:

You're doing the Gods' work, mate, I can't imagine how difficult it must be at the moment.

The suggested isolation period for the over 70's and carers is going to make things so difficult, there is talk from some American states that schools will be closed and not expected to return until the new year.

As far as God is concerned he certainly is making life very hard for so many!

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23 minutes ago, Downsouth said:

The suggested isolation period for the over 70's and carers is going to make things so difficult, there is talk from some American states that schools will be closed and not expected to return until the new year.

As far as God is concerned he certainly is making life very hard for so many!

Mysterious Ways buddy 

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There are loads of people keeping their kids off school this morning, but one thing that's been widely overlooked in the "we need to shut the schools NOW" argument is the practical implications of that further down the line. If you shut all the schools for several months, who looks after the kids? The parents, who then can't do their own jobs? The grandparents, who are being told to self-isolate and are already most at risk of catching COVID-19 from the people (children) least likely to wash their hands and follow good hygiene etiquette? You might be able to fudge childcare for a week or two, but if the pandemic isn't going to peak til June, how do you fudge it for months on end? At least as we inch closer to Easter and the summer holidays, families may already have some plans in place for long-term childcare.

Ireland may have acted more quickly than the UK, but I suspect many Irish families will bitterly regret their Government's quick action in a month or two's time when the outbreak shows no sign of ending. While the pandemic is still at a relatively early stage, and we don't have enough knowledge of what we're dealing with, I think the UK Government's approach is more sensible than telling everyone to stay at home indefinitely. That gets old very quickly, and the mental health repercussions of prolonged isolation are hard to quantify. 

And to the people saying it's Boris deciding herd immunity is the long-term plan, Boris couldn't decide whether to stand up or sit down for a p*ss. He's being advised by the most senior medical experts in the UK. I don't like our Government, but I think the expert advisers who would be advising a Government of any colour should know more about managing a new pandemic effectively than newspaper columnists, Facebook addicts and people who just cannot miss an opportunity to slag off the Tories.

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14 hours ago, BoroMart said:

Sorry mate but that isn't acceptable. We have a department of health that should have plans in place for global pandemic scenarios. They may not have every variable understood, but control methods and disaster mitigation should exist already. Playing it by ear means that no one has learnt a thing from previous pandemics, either here or more recently in africa and asia, and that our leadership have been negligent in preparation. 

Well maybe you should be the government's CMO, if you're such an expert.

In case you hadn't noticed...NOBODY IN THE ENTIRE WORLD has been prepared for this.

Every virus can be different, with different transmission methods, different levels of contagion, different symptoms / methods of detection...not to mention different ways of effectively quarantining and treating cases.

Pretty much all the world's experts have been caught out by this, so perhaps you should take that into account before being so critical.

Effectively combating pandemics, depends to a large extent on having a good deal of historical data on previous outbreaks. Covid 19 is new, therefore there isn't any historical data to fall back on.

Also, in case you hadn't noticed, we've still got just about the lowest numbers of confirmed cases & deaths of any country with a significant outbreak.

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Well at least the government has finally started having daily briefings which anyone can follow if they wish. Instead of all these weird private briefings and newspaper articles hidden behind paywalls. Hopefully going forward the advice is clearer and easy to access. 
 

 

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12 hours ago, wilsoncgp said:

Who else is able to and is being directed to work from home soon or already?

In an industry like mine it makes sense. We're on computers all day, there are some quirks to make sure everything runs smoothly but generally we're hearing a lot of companies going into lockdown. Me and my wife both work at different companies in the same industry and we've already had one person who has potentially caught the virus in each place so efforts have been stepped up to make sure things don't shut down entirely.

I'm worried for people who work in non-essential areas of retail who may be forced to go home, I've already heard some won't be paid and the government is being pushed to extend some form of SSP to them. Given the reputation of the universal benefits scheme, I'm really worried some are going to go without.

Well I work as a flood defence engineer in the Environment Agency. Since my work is mostly aimed at the maintenance & upgrade of sites, most of our on-site work is done during the Summer & Autumn.

I'm also currently doing some training & assessment work with our field teams. So far we've had a few confirmed cases in other areas, but in my patch its business as usual...for now. 

The only staff who would have to work regardless are the incident response teams - the personnel who man our barriers, pumping stations, erect temporary defences etc.

As to folks who don't qualify for SSP - the Chancellor's statement did mention that financial assistance would be available to at least some. But I think some will inevitably fall through the net.

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8 minutes ago, sackrobson2 said:

Well at least the government has finally started having daily briefings which anyone can follow if they wish. Instead of all these weird private briefings and newspaper articles hidden behind paywalls. Hopefully going forward the advice is clearer and easy to access. 
 

 

Well, hopefully hearing it straight from the horse's mouth, as it were, might lay to rest some of the rumours and fake news doing the rounds on the interwebz.

The Beeb often gets a bad rap, but during times of crisis, I'd still rather follow them than anyone else. At least they say what isn't known, rather than speculating, or recycling dodgy stuff from other sites.

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57 minutes ago, RiseAgainst said:

There are loads of people keeping their kids off school this morning, but one thing that's been widely overlooked in the "we need to shut the schools NOW" argument is the practical implications of that further down the line. If you shut all the schools for several months, who looks after the kids? The parents, who then can't do their own jobs? The grandparents, who are being told to self-isolate and are already most at risk of catching COVID-19 from the people (children) least likely to wash their hands and follow good hygiene etiquette? You might be able to fudge childcare for a week or two, but if the pandemic isn't going to peak til June, how do you fudge it for months on end? At least as we inch closer to Easter and the summer holidays, families may already have some plans in place for long-term childcare.

Ireland may have acted more quickly than the UK, but I suspect many Irish families will bitterly regret their Government's quick action in a month or two's time when the outbreak shows no sign of ending. While the pandemic is still at a relatively early stage, and we don't have enough knowledge of what we're dealing with, I think the UK Government's approach is more sensible than telling everyone to stay at home indefinitely. That gets old very quickly, and the mental health repercussions of prolonged isolation are hard to quantify. 

And to the people saying it's Boris deciding herd immunity is the long-term plan, Boris couldn't decide whether to stand up or sit down for a p*ss. He's being advised by the most senior medical experts in the UK. I don't like our Government, but I think the expert advisers who would be advising a Government of any colour should know more about managing a new pandemic effectively than newspaper columnists, Facebook addicts and people who just cannot miss an opportunity to slag off the Tories.

Schools and daycares are shut down in Denmark. It's up to the parents to find ways of taking care of the children. People who occupy critical jobs, such as doctors etc. can get special care for their children if they can't find other ways. Both my wife and I work from home so are at home with the kids. Their schools have done a fairly good job at providing online education. If you can't work from home you need to take time off either without pay or holidays. Almost all public employees have been sent home to work or are at home with pay. It's up to the private employees to find out what they do but they are not obliged to pay their employees. If companies need to lay off workers the governement will fund 75% of the salary to help keep them aboard instead of mass layoffs.  Certain criterias have to be met though. In short it's up to the parents to figure out what to do and apart from a minority that will always complain it's the only solution to me. Everyone has to sacrifice something in a situation like this whether it's unplanned holidays or taking turns watching the kids. 

About 80% of the workforce are organised in Denmark so there is obviously a very close cooperation between the government, Unions and Employer Organisations to help smooth things along. By and large people are well aware that sacrifices need to be made. 

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Just a thought. If more and more countries implement shut downs will the internet slow down or even crash. 
if you think about the amount who will be using the internet while in isolation, it’s a possibility. Just think we will have to start talking to each other again. 
 

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